Psychotherapy for Addiction Recovery

Psychotherapy for addiction recovery

There’s no magic blueprint for the perfect drug rehab program. Everyone has different needs when it comes to addiction recovery. With that said, a few services work wonders for most people. One of the best examples is psychotherapy. The term “psychotherapy” simply refers to talk therapy. It’s a range of treatments that help people with mental health disorders. Addiction is one disease therapy can treat because it’s a mental illness. Rather than use medicine, therapy helps people understand their feelings and change their lifestyle.

What is Psychotherapy?

Psychotherapy, which people refer to as just talk therapy or counseling, helps people with an array of mental illnesses. Since addiction is a mental disorder, therapy works wonders with managing addiction. In either case, it controls or eliminates troubling symptoms that stem from disorders and emotions. Dealing with negative emotions can assist people in improving their overall well-being.

Key Areas in Psychotherapy Helps People

Psychotherapy can help people on a number of levels and with a variety of problems. For example, it’s important for dealing with trauma. It can also help people deal with specific disorders such as anxiety and depression. However, how does dealing with these problems help people overcome addiction? After all, most experts agree that a psychotherapy treatment program is a good option for people with this disease.

Counseling helps because it addresses the root cause of addiction, which could be a mental health illness. Most people don’t aim to abuse drugs. It just kind of happens. Typically, drug abuse is the result of another underlying problem. For example, people who struggle with trauma or depression don’t always seek professional help. Instead, they self-medicate in order to feel normal. However, taking drugs only makes them feel normal for a short period of time. In order to get lasting relief, they have to deal with the underlying issues.

Psychotherapy Types and Techniques

Mental health treatment can’t have a one-size-fits-all approach because there are various diagnosable illnesses. People also experience many different symptoms that vary in severity. Addiction is no different, therefore, experts develop numerous psychotherapy techniques for comprehensive treatment.

One-on-One and Group Therapies

There are traditional forms of therapy as well. For example, one-on-one sessions involve only one client and a therapist. Together, they focus on the cause of addiction while addressing buried emotions. Group sessions can involve up to 12 clients and one or more therapists. Overall, clients have similar problems, so they benefit from building relationships with their peers. They observe how others handle issues and provide feedback to facilitate change and improvement. Not to mention, the support clients get in group therapy helps them overcome the sense of isolation addiction creates. Although it scares some people, the sessions demonstrate that nobody is alone in their addiction struggle.

Family Therapy

Overall, family counseling is a type of talk therapy that helps relatives resolve conflicts. Additionally, families learn skills for strengthening their relationships and getting through hard times. Each person has the opportunity for further emotional support as well. Licensed therapists provide this service to our families. As a part of treatment, therapy might include every family member or only those willing to participate. Family therapy is similar to group therapy because multiple clients participate. However, it generally includes the client with addiction, their closest loved ones, and one therapist.

Behavior Therapy

Behavior therapy is a technique that helps people understand how their behavior makes them feel. Thus, it focuses on doing more positive activities like those that reinforce social interaction. Overall, the main objective is to replace negative behavior with positive alternatives.

Therapists achieve this by assessing the specifics of client behavior. Then, they enhance their client’s opportunities for positive experiences. This approach is most helpful for people whose emotional distress is evident in their own behavior.

Cognitive Therapy

As another technique, cognitive therapy focuses on the theory that the way people think shapes how they feel. Therefore, changing inaccurate or negative beliefs positively affects how an individual feels and perceives situations.

Rather than look at the past, cognitive counseling focuses on current patterns of thinking and interacting with others. For example, therapists help clients confront improper thoughts by showing them various perspectives of similar situations.

Oak Forest Recovery Offers Psychotherapy

Whether you need drug or alcohol addiction treatment, Oak Forest Recovery provides therapy for your unique needs. Addressing substance use and other mental health problems, please reach us today at (805) 390-6647 or submit the form below to learn more. 

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    The Importance of Group Therapy in Addiction Treatment

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    Group therapy and the experiential group therapy activities often involved are a mainstay for those who desire to overcome substance abuse forever. While both individual and group therapy are designed to help individuals gain insight, learn healthier coping skills, and work through challenging issues, group therapy has many unique benefits that complement individual therapy. That’s why group therapy is so important.

    What is Group Therapy?

    Group therapy, in a nutshell, is therapy that involves two or more individuals at the same time – in addition to the therapist – rather than one person in recovery working one-on-one with a therapist. Participants in a therapy group take turns talking about their struggles, feelings, experiences, and goals. Therapy groups may be tailored to a specific recovery topic, such as how to recognize and avoid triggers, or they may be general, such as how to handle difficult family, peer, work, or other interpersonal relationships.

    Group Therapy and Addiction Treatment are Natural Allies

    The group therapy process allows you to benefit from your interactions with other group members, not just from the input of and interaction with the therapist. In individual therapy you may wonder if the therapist has ever walked in your shoes and can even begin to truly understand what you’re going through. In group therapy for alcohol or substance use disorders, however, you’re guaranteed to have at least one thing in common with the people in your group: your alcohol or substance use disorder.

    The effectiveness of group therapy in the treatment of substance abuse also can be attributed to the nature of addiction and several factors associated with it, including (but not limited to) depression, anxiety, isolation, denial, shame, temporary cognitive impairment, and character pathology (personality disorder, structural deficits, or an incohesive sense of self). Whether a person abuses substances or not, these problems often respond better to group treatment than to individual therapy. Group therapy is also effective because people are fundamentally relational creatures.

    Advantages of Group Treatment

    • Group Therapy provides positive peer support and pressure to abstain from substances of abuse. 
    • Groups reduce the sense of isolation that most people who have substance abuse disorders experience. 
    • Groups enable people who abuse substances to witness the recovery of others. 
    • Groups help members learn to cope with their substance abuse and other problems by allowing them to see how others deal with similar problems. 
    • Groups can provide useful information to clients who are new to recovery. 
    • Groups provide feedback concerning the values and abilities of other group members. 
    • Groups offer family‐like experiences. 
    • Groups offer members the opportunity to learn or relearn the social skills they need to cope with everyday life instead of resorting to substance abuse. 
    • Groups can effectively confront individual members about substance abuse and other harmful behaviors.
    • Groups allow a single treatment professional to help a number of clients at the same time.
    • Groups can add needed structure and discipline to the lives of people with substance use disorders, who often enter treatment with their lives in chaos.
    • Groups often support and provide encouragement to one another outside the group setting.

    This is why group therapy and support groups are avenues everyone on the road to recovery should explore. If you want to find out more, be sure to give us a call at Oak Forest Recovery on (805) 390-6647

    Sources

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK64223/

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